Marion Philadelphia

Photo by: Ziva Santop/ Steve Cohn Photography
Photo by: Ziva Santop/ Steve Cohn Photography

USC Marshall School of Business

Mentoring is essential for faculty professional growth and well-being—for me it is primarily the active exchange with colleagues in regards to teaching and learning. Faculty are part of a large group of peers, but when it comes to teaching, we stand alone in front of our students.

This is why having a faculty mentor partner is so important—someone with whom we can openly share ideas or personal challenges. A mentor is a confidante, a sounding board, a teaching and learning consultant, a motivator, a critic, a coach and also a friend. Listening to colleagues’ needs is essential, no matter if we discuss pedagogical strategies, new instructional ideas, or work on becoming compelling speakers and facilitators in the classroom environment. Together, we define goals, discuss ways to reach them and learn from each other in the process. Over the years, my own mentors have given me the strength to continuously seek to improve, dare to take on new challenges, change the ways I am teaching, help me develop as a professional and actively contribute to my school community. I hope to inspire my colleagues in these very same ways.